Wednesday, 22 May 2019

All sessions will take place on Level 4  unless otherwise indicated 

8:00 AM — 3:00 PM

Registration

Location: Texan Ballroom Foyer

8:15 — 9:00 AM

Networking Breakfast

Location: Texan Ballroom Foyer

Sponsored by:

9:00 — 9:05 AM

Welcome Remarks

Location: Salons F-G

Senior Editor,
West Coast,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Introduction

Bill Mongelluzzo

9:05 — 9:45 AM

Day 2 Keynote Address:
Supply Chain Optimization in the Age of Disruption

Location: Salons F-G

Senior Editor,
West Coast, JOC,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Introduction

Bill Mongelluzzo

Chairman and CEO,
American Global Logistics

Keynote Speaker

Jon Slangerup

Importers and exporters face growing pressure to streamline their supply chains, or they risk missing key cutoff dates for shipments and increased demurrage and detention charges. At the same time, the marine terminals that handle their containers are increasingly congested in this mega-ship era, resulting in lengthy truck delays at terminal gates and missed deadlines for returning empty containers or delivering export loads. Now that calls by 8,500-TEU vessels and larger are a weekly occurrence at US Gulf ports, shippers in the region must take a fresh look at their supply chain strategies. They should consider utilizing technology tools that provide greater visibility to conditions at marine terminals, and seek assistance from logistics partners who can help them pre-plan deliveries and pickups in order to meet critical deadlines and circumvent unexpected bottlenecks when they occur in the supply chain. Day 2 keynote speaker Jon Slangerup, chairman and CEO of American Global Logistics, has spent his career in supply chain logistics with FedEx Canada and as executive director of the Port of Long Beach. Having fostered change in three sectors of the international supply chain, Slangerup brings his unique perspective on supply chain efficiency to the 2019 JOC Gulf Shipping Conference.

9:45 — 10:30 AM

The Shipper View of Gulf Trade

Location: Salons F-G

Vice President,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Session Chair

Peter Tirschwell

President and Executive Director, USSA
 

Panelist

Beverly Altimore

Supply Chain Manager,
FBD Partnership

Panelist

Darryl Cline

Senior Vice President,
Logistics and Supply Chain,
Academy Sports + Outdoor

Panelist

Sherry Harriman

Senior Manager,
Supply Chain
and Customs Compliance
Igloo Products

Panelist

Becky Wu-Lee

US importers and exporters shipping through the US Gulf ended 2018 with more questions than answers about the future. Although container shipping services are increasing rapidly — driven by double-digit growth in imports — lingering questions about the US-China trade war are complicating the outlook for retail and manufactured goods on the inbound trade, and resins, cotton, and other agricultural products on the outbound. Meanwhile, storm clouds are gathering over the International Maritime Organization’s low-sulfur fuel mandate that, starting next January, could increase container carriers’ fuel bill by up to $15 billion a year, a good slice of which, if not all, could be passed on to shippers. Meanwhile, Union Pacific’s decision to eliminate intermodal rail service between Houston and Dallas complicates an already-troublesome intermodal and surface transportation market throughout the Gulf, exacerbated by the year-old ELD regulation on trucks and an ongoing driver shortage. This session will delve into these and other major issues — including shippers’ expectations from their transportation and logistics providers and their current and future use of technology solutions — in a roundtable discussion that will leave no doubt about the state of customer service in the supply chain.

10:30 — 11:00 AM

Networking Break

Location: Texan Ballroom Foyer

11:00 AM — 12:00 PM

Room to Grow? An Analysis of the Industrial Real Estate
Market, the Real Driver of Gulf Trade

Location: Salons F-G

The market for warehouses and distribution centers in the Gulf region is experiencing the lowest vacancy rates in years, driven by traditionally strong exports, rapidly increasing imports and growth in e-commerce fulfillment. The ports of Houston, New Orleans, and Mobile have always enjoyed strong exports, especially from the petrochemical, agricultural, and forest products sectors. Industrial real estate developers have responded by expanding export warehouses and packing plants. Resin exports burst on the scene two years ago when an explosion of low-cost shale gas from oil fracking operations provided the raw material for resin production. In recent years, imports have been growing rapidly because of development of import distribution centers in the Gulf region by retailers, led by Walmart, and manufacturers. An increasing number of import containers carrying consumer merchandise from Asia indirectly are reducing the cost of exports because the containers are unloaded in proximity to export facilities, The empties are being reloaded with export cargoes, reducing reliance on costly repositioning of empties from distant locations. Exporters this year have faced two significant challenges, the US-China trade war and resulting tariffs on imports from the US, and the need for additional outbound vessel capacity to Asia. The Gulf region has three weekly trans-Pacific services, and even though vessels are generally full outbound, trans-Pacific carriers enter new services into a trade lane based upon demand for imports, which command freight rates four to five times export rates. This session will analyze the demand for warehousing and DC space in the Gulf, and how service and equipment providers are — or aren’t — supporting their shipper customers in fulfilling their needs during the extended rally.

Senior Editor,
West Coast,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Session Chair

Bill Mongelluzzo

Vice President
and Market Leader,
Houston,
Liberty Property Trust

Panelist

Hans Brindley

President,
IMS Worldwide

Panelist

Curtis Spencer

Senior Managing Director,
HFF

Panelist

Rusty Tamlyn

12:00 — 1:00 PM

Networking Lunch

Location: Salon E

1:00 — 1:30 PM

Reshaping Logistics Through Technology:
The JOC View

Location: Salons F-G

The technologies that will change the future of logistics have largely already revolutionized a range of other commercial industries, including finance, advertising, insurance, and manufacturing. But how will blockchain, artificial intelligence, machine learning, the Internet of Things, and other concepts reshape how logistics is conducted? It’s a big question, and the answers depend on multiple variables, including the cost of the technologies, industry reluctance to change, and a perception that some of these concepts aren’t ready for prime time. So what can the logistics industry learn from the adoption of these technologies in other industries, and what might that adoption curve look like?

Vice President,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Featured Speaker

Peter Tirschwell

1:30 — 2:15 PM

Improving Cargo Visibility:
Will Technology Solve Shippers' No.1 Demand?

Location: Salons F-G

Vice President,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Market

Session Chair

Peter Tirschwell

Vice President,
Global Sales,
Toll Global Forwarding

Panelist

Eric Lindberg

Chief Commercial Officer, Shipwell

Panelist

Nate Lourie

Although many shippers still struggle for basic consistent information on the precise location of their in-transit cargo, the discussion around freight visibility in recent years has moved inexorably up the value chain. Whereas visibility was once viewed as a tool to manage when disruption struck, advancements in software and system integration today allow shippers to use visibility as a predictive weapon in the battle against supply chain volatility. Shippers, technology providers, and 3PLs will share their experience in moving toward an environment where cargo interests can predict and assess when problems will occur, and when freight is likely to arrive, helping them reduce inventory, manage risk, and create opportunities for working capital.

2:15 — 3:15 PM

State of the Ports:
A Roundtable Discussion With Gulf Port Leaders

Location: Salons F-G

Senior Editor,
West Coast,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Session Chair

Bill Mongelluzzo

Vice President,
Marketing and
Business Development,
Port Tampa Bay

Panelist

Wade Elliott

Managing Director,
APM Terminals Mobile

Panelist

Brian Harold

Commercial Director,
Port of New Orleans

Panelist

Janine M. Mansour

Trade Director,
Port of Houston

Panelist

Dominic Sun

The widening of the Panama Canal in 2016 to allow transit of 14,000-TEU vessels created a sense of urgency among US Gulf ports to expand marine terminal capacity, deepen harbors, and accelerate transportation infrastructure development to accommodate a growing two-way trade with Asia. The once export-dominant Gulf ports came close to balance in 2018, as imports totaled 1.7 million TEU and exports 1.6 million TEU. The expansion of import distribution centers in the region has attracted three weekly services from Asia, with the potential for even more services if the ports can accommodate the mega-ships that dominate the largest US trade lane. New Orleans has been authorized to deepen its ship channel from 45 to 50 feet. Houston, Mobile, and New Orleans are investing millions of dollars to modernize their marine terminals and improve the road and rail infrastructure needed to stretch the ports’ hinterland beyond the immediate Gulf and mid-South region. Houston’s decision in April to limit ship channel traffic to one direction as vessel sizes increase indicates that work still needs to be done. In addition to the pressing infrastructure needs, the Gulf ports are promoting process improvements such as extended gates and trucker appointment systems to increase cargo velocity. This panel of port leaders will explore the challenges facing Gulf ports and the measures they are taking to make the Gulf the gateway of choice for shipping lines and BCOs in the growing US container trades. 

Heading 1

3:15 PM

Closing Remarks

Location: Salons F-G

Bill Mongelluzzo

 

Senior Editor,

West Coast,

JOC, Maritime & Trade,

IHS Markit

STATEMENT OF JOC CONFERENCE EDITORIAL POLICY: All JOC conference programs are developed independently by the JOC editorial team based on input from a wide variety of industry experts and the editors' own industry knowledge, contacts and experience. The editorial team determines session topics and extends all speaker invitations based entirely on the goal of providing highly relevant content for conference attendees. Certain sponsors may give welcoming remarks or introduce certain sessions, but if a sponsor appears as a bona-fide speaker it will be because of an editorial invitation, not as a benefit of sponsorship. Sponsorship benefits do not include speaking on a program.