Tuesday, 21 May 2019

All sessions will take place on Level 4  unless otherwise indicated 

7:30 AM — 5:00 PM

Registration

Location: Texan Ballroom Foyer

7:30 — 8:30 AM

Welcome Breakfast

Location: Texan Ballroom Foyer

Sponsored by:

8:30 — 8:45 AM

Welcome Remarks

Location: Salons F-G

Director,
Programming,
JOC Events,
Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

Introduction

Chris Brooks

8:45 — 9:30 AM

Keynote Address

Location: Salons F-G

Vice President,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Introduction and Session Chair

Peter Tirschwell

President,
CMA CGM America

Keynote Speaker

Ludovic Renou

“Customers want more from their carriers. They expect new products and services to substantially enhance their experience and add predictability to their supply chains. Carriers have been pressed to find innovative solutions in an industry where pricing pressures can dominate the conversation.” So wrote Ludovic Renou, president of CMA CGM America, in the JOC Annual Review and Outlook, published in January. It’s no exaggeration to say that CMA CGM’s business is changing more than most container carriers, not only in the US Gulf, but globally. In February, the Marseilles, France-based company, No. 4 on Alphaliner's ranking of global container carriers by deployed capacity, announced it would extend its Pacific Express 3 all-water Asia service to Tampa in May. The expanded service connects Houston, Mobile, and New Orleans to China, South Korea, and Vietnam on a round-the-world loop — the inbound service is via the Panama Canal and outbound is through Suez. The launch arrives on the heels of a new Day 3 Product that, as of April, includes new services through the Gulf from CMA CGM and its Ocean Alliance partners Cosco Shipping, Evergreen Line, and OOCL. Meanwhile, the French carrier’s takeover of CEVA Logistics is pushing forward its offering of end-to-end solutions less than three years after the acquisition of APL/NOL. Now head of CMA CGM’s US division for just more than a year, Renou will briefly present the CMA CGM view of the market before sitting down for an in-depth conversation about where the company is, where it sees itself going, and how it plans to deliver on — in Renou's words — shippers’ demands for new products and services.

9:30 — 10:30 AM

Container Shipping Outlook:
How Long will the Gulf Rally Last?

Location: Salons F-G

Director,
Trade & Development,
Alabama State Port Authority
and APM Terminals

Session Introduction

Parrish Lawler

Senior Editor,
West Coast,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Session Chair

Bill Mongelluzzo

Regional Director,
USA West Operations,
BDP International

Panelist

Pablo Avila

Director,
Economics and Country Risk,
IHS Markit

Panelist

Paul Bingham

Partner,
Hackett Associates

Panelist

Daniel Hackett

Executive Vice President,
Export Liner Services,
MSC Mediterranean Shipping
Company (USA)

Panelist

GianCarlo Morgera

In many respects, 2018 was a turnkey year for container shipping through the US Gulf. The region, historically a dominant outlet for exports, attracted two new all-water ocean services from Asia through the Panama Canal that helped extend its run of double-digit gains in imports to three years. More services are coming, with Cosco Shipping adding a weekly route in January, and CMA CGM extending its weekly service to Port Tampa Bay in May. Overall, imports through the region jumped 11.4 percent year over year in 2018, while exports — feeling the effects of real and threatened tariffs in the US-China trade war — managed a 4.4 percent increase, according to data from JOC parent company IHS Markit. The much-anticipated boom in resins exports, meanwhile, appears to have arrived after a couple of years of fits and starts related to delayed startups of new or expanded production plants. Resins exports through the region increased 15 percent overall in 2018, but, in a significant sign of the impact of the trade war, rose just 2 percent to China, according to IHS Markit. With the US economy on solid footing and negotiations with China appearing to suggest a near-term resolution, 2019 could be another solid year for trade through the Gulf. But to get there will require overcoming significant headwinds, most notably in overseas markets. The IHS Markit Purchasing Managers’ Index fell for the sixth consecutive month in March, and the global manufacturing PMI is stagnating, indicating industrial stagnation or recession in regions such as the eurozone, Japan, and China. US protectionist policies meanwhile, are only exacerbating the problem. The good news is that the services sector remains strong, China is again providing stimulus in the form of tax cuts that will stabilize the manufacturing sectors in that country and elsewhere. “Both these trends will sustain (economic) growth for a while,” IHS Markit Chief Economist Nariman Behravesh wrote in a March report. This kickoff session to the 2019 Gulf Shipping Conference will analyze the outlook for containerized shipping, the factors that will determine the market’s direction, and how carriers and other service providers are adjusting.

Sponsored by:

10:30 — 11:00 AM

Networking Break

Location: Texan Ballroom Foyer

Sponsored by:

11:00 — 11:30 AM

With the Resins Boom Upon Us, What's Next?
The Outlook From IHS Markit

Location: Salons F-G

Executive Editor,
JOC.com and
The Journal of Commerce,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit 

Introduction

Mark Szakonyi

Associate Director,
Polyolefins Market
Research Group,
IHS Markit

Featured Speaker

Javier Ortiz

Markets throughout the Gulf and beyond have been eagerly anticipating the wave of new North American polyethylene expansions, which are adding to the supply available for export. Most recently, ExxonMobil in March said it will build a new polypropylene plant in Baton Rouge that will expand capacity along the Gulf Coast by up to 450,000 tons a year when production begins in 2021. These and other expansions could lead to a doubling of resin exports over the next couple of years. If 2018 is an indication, the rapid growth in exports has begun: Exports of ethylene polymers soared 66.8 percent to 110,890 TEU in 2018, petrochemical resins jumped 25.5 percent to 105,924 TEU, and plastic articles spiked 17 percent to 64,661 TEU. With new and expanded plants expected to open this year, the growth in exports, as well as pressure on the supply chain, should only accelerate from here. Javier Ortiz, associate director in IHS Markit’s Polyolefins Market Research Group, will evaluate the current export dynamic in North America for plastic resin plants and what the future will hold as new plants come online.

11:30 AM — 12:30 PM

The Resins Are Coming:
Calibrating Supply Chains

Location: Salons F-G

After a few false starts, a massive wave of US polyethylene resin exports will begin testing containerized supply chains this year and for the foreseeable future. Chinese tariffs will slow the wave, but they won’t stop it. There’s a sense of confidence among some producers and transportation providers that they’ll be ready. Even so, they are clear-eyed about the labor challenges in the plants themselves and in securing skilled drivers able to truck the goods to marine terminals. Unexpected domestic demand sapped some of the strength of resin exports last year, but analysts and transportation providers expect an acceleration of outbound shipments in the second half of this year. The extent of the growth is difficult to gauge because Chinese tariffs — part of a larger trade war with the US — have made most polyethylene product exports financially unfeasible. Optimism of a tariff resolution, coupled with the United States’ status as a polyethylene powerhouse, are sustaining high expectations for continuing strong exports. Even so, there’s plenty of work ahead to keep the higher volumes moving efficiently. This session will explore the scale of the wave and put Chinese headwinds in context, while discussing what still needs to be done so supply chains can ride the resin wave.

Executive Editor,
JOC.com and
The Journal of Commerce,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Session Chair

Mark Szakonyi

President and CEO,
Excargo

Panelist

Marcia Faschingbauer

Vice President,
Business Development,
MTS Logistics

Panelist

M. Can Fidan

Director,
Transportation,
Vinmar

Panelist

Alessandro Menezes

Associate Director,
Polyolefins Market
Research Group,
IHS Markit

Panelist

Javier Ortiz

12:30 — 1:30 PM

Networking Lunch

Location: Salon E

1:30  — 2:30 PM

US-Mexico Trade:
The BCO Case for Shipping by Water vs. Land

Location: Salons F-G

Mexican importers increasingly are turning to cross-Gulf ocean services that connect Mexico to ports in the Gulf and Florida to serve central Florida and the Southeast. At the Port of Tampa, cargo to and from Mexico nearly doubled in 2018, to 25,000 TEU from 13,000 TEU a year earlier, largely as a result of the May 2018 launch of a service operated by ocean carrier TransGulf from Tuxpan, as well as routes from the Mexican ports of Progreso and Altamira operated by Lina Peninsular. PortMiami also has been looking to expand its business with Mexico, an effort assisted in 2017 when Grupo México Transportes purchased Florida East Coast Railway from Fortress Investment Group. The port handled between 10,000 and 14,000 TEU in Mexican imports and exports, with four services — including from Sealand, OOCL, and CMA CGM — linking Miami with the Mexican Gulf Coast ports. They include Veracruz, Altamira, Morelos, Tampico, and Yucatan. About 15 percent of the trade is refrigerated goods, including export shipments of flowers, and other exports such as beer and electrical goods. In addition to potentially being quicker and cheaper, cross-Gulf moves can be simpler than moves by land, with fewer stops, less paperwork, and reduced use of trucks and service providers to set up the transportation. This session will analyze the benefits shippers moving goods to and from Mexico can gain by choosing a cross-Gulf ocean route versus cross-border land transport.

Executive Editor,
JOC.com and
The Journal of Commerce,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Session Chair

Mark Szakonyi

Director,
Marketing and Business Development,
Port Tampa Bay

Panelist

Greg Lovelace

Director,
Global Trade and
Business Development,
PortMiami

Panelist

Eric Olafson

CEO,
TransGulf Shipping

Panelist

William Taylor

2:30  — 3:30 PM

The North-South Reefer Trade:
As Demand Grows, So Do Shippers' Routing Options

Location: Salons F-G

US Gulf Coast ports continue to diversify their import-export cargo mix, while simultaneously making sizeable investments in infrastructure — deepening harbors and ship channels; improving terminals and container yards; expanding cold storage capacity; and upgrading road and rail links. The result is growing north-south trade for a variety of containerized cargoes, including perishables such as chilled and frozen foods. Stakeholders in the global cold chain, from ports and carriers to beneficial cargo owners, cold storage providers and others, are capitalizing on the emerging services and options in the refrigerated shipping market. Wrinkles need to be ironed out, however. Although reefer equipment imbalances are easing, getting the right equipment at the right time and place remains an issue. Terminal congestion and timely handling of frozen — and even less-forgiving chilled produce — is another pain point for BCOs. Overall, the US Gulf Coast represents a vibrant and growing region for expanding trade in refrigerated cargo, but the onus rests on BCOs and their cold chain partners to collectively realize the extent of those opportunities. This session will analyze the state of the north-south cold chain, the challenges Gulf interests face, and the sector’s changing dynamics.

Editorial Director,
AC Business Media's Supply Chain Network (includes Food Logistics and Supply & Demand Chain Executive)

Session Chair

Lara Sowinski

Head of Refrigerated Sales,
Sealand - A Maersk Company

Panelist

Tom Krajewski

Vice President,
International Supply
Chain Solutions,
MTC Logistics

Panelist

Brooks Royster

Regional Director,
Operations,
Americold Logistics

Panelist

Rudy Sandoval

3:30  — 4:00 PM

Networking Break

Location: Texan Ballroom Foyer

Sponsored by:

4:00  — 5:00 PM

When Disruption Strikes:
Addressing the Pressure Points at Inland Destinations

Location: Salons F-G

It’s been a tumultuous year for shippers using Chicago, Dallas, and Memphis rail ramps. In Dallas, shippers deal with inconsistent service from ports in the Gulf and Southern California. Drayage capacity is tight, so being unable to predict when a container will be available makes it difficult to book a driver. In January, chassis shortages in Chicago and Memphis, also major inland hubs for Gulf shippers, caused beneficial cargo owners to incur thousands in demurrage and per diem fees. Shippers also have experienced issues with CSX Transportation’s appointment system in Memphis and Chicago. This session will discuss how these problems have complicated the supply chain in key Gulf Coast inland hubs, whether there’s relief in sight for shippers, especially during cargo peaks, and what remedies are available.

Sponsored by:

Commercial Manager - Imports,
Port New Orleans

Session Introduction

Amanda Coates

Associate Editor,
Southeast Ports and
Intermodal Rail,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Session Chair

Ari Ashe

Vice President,
Business Development,
Gulf Winds International

Panelist

Brad Elam

Vice President,
Intermodal,
Kansas City Southern Railway

Panelist

Erik Bo Hansen

Director,
Trade Operations,
Olam Cotton

Panelist

Meagan Lobban

Chief Operating Officer,
Dunavant Global Logistics Group

Panelist

Richard McDuffie

Director,
International Logistics,
American Tire Distributors

Panelist

George Pavlichko

5:00  — 5:30 PM

The Houston Ship Channel:
Growth, Challenges, Opportunities,
and Charting the Course Forward 

Location: Salons F-G

The Houston Ship Channel is the nation’s busiest waterway with nearly 9,000 deepwater vessel calls and more than 200,000 barges a year calling the private and public terminals that comprise the greater Port of Houston. It serves the growing needs of one of the fastest-growing consumer markets in the US, the largest and fastest-growing petrochemical complex in North America and exports of agricultural and other commodities that make Texas the No. 1 exporting state. Houston, the energy capital of the world, also makes the Port of Houston, a national strategic asset as the primary gateway needed to the serve the country’s ambitious plans to increase energy exports. But in recent weeks, news about the channel and its big-ship capability have sparked questions from the industry about the next steps as the surging volumes through the port show no signs of slowing. Roger Guenther, Port Houston’s executive director, will discuss the port authority’s vision and strategic plan to address the needs of the ship channel’s different stakeholders in an era of unprecedented growth.

Director,
Programming,
JOC Events,
Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

Introduction

Chris Brooks

Executive Director,
Port Houston

Featured Speaker

Roger Guenther

5:30 — 7:00 PM

Networking Reception

Location: Texan Ballroom Foyer

Sponsored by:

STATEMENT OF JOC CONFERENCE EDITORIAL POLICY: All JOC conference programs are developed independently by the JOC editorial team based on input from a wide variety of industry experts and the editors' own industry knowledge, contacts and experience. The editorial team determines session topics and extends all speaker invitations based entirely on the goal of providing highly relevant content for conference attendees. Certain sponsors may give welcoming remarks or introduce certain sessions, but if a sponsor appears as a bona-fide speaker it will be because of an editorial invitation, not as a benefit of sponsorship. Sponsorship benefits do not include speaking on a program.